FACULTY

We are an interactive group, with a strong emphasis on collaboration and cooperation. Faculty are deeply engaged in student mentoring; they provide both oversight and support as students work toward their doctoral degree. The intent is to train students as future academic peers, and provide a rigorous and engaging intellectual environment for all program members.

Members of the CSD Program currently include 36 full time PhD students and 60 faculty from 10 basic science and clinical departments. Our faculty members and their labs further align themselves with, but are not restricted to, 1 or more of 3 research sub-areas under the umbrella of our CSD Program:


Primary Research Sub-Areas

Cell Biology

Cell biology is a dynamic discipline that combines the interests and methods of a wide variety of scientific fields. Studies of cell function are central to modern biological research as they focus upon investigating the basic structural and functional unit of life: the cell. By applying a wide range of experimental approaches to the study of cellular processes, including biochemical and physical analysis of molecules and cells in culture, and morphological methods, cell biologist have made major discoveries that have had a dramatic impact on human health. This key link between fundamental studies of cell function and their relevance to disease is highlighted by the work of the Cell Biology Faculty within the Graduate Program in Cell Biology, Stem Cells and Development. Ongoing studies in the areas of membrane trafficking, membrane dynamics, cell signaling, motility, organelle composition and function, studies of the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix provide important insights and information that is ultimately crucial for developing effective treatments for cancer, heart disease, AIDS, and a host of other diseases that disrupt normal cell function. 

Stem Cells

Stem Cell Biology Research offers enormous therapeutic potential for a wide range of clinical disorders including Parkinson's disease, diabetes, chronic heart disease, end-stage renal disease, liver failure and cancer. Realizing the promise of using stem cells in treating human disease will ultimately depend upon defining the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. These fundamental principles are at the heart of modern Cell Biology, Stem Cells and Development and highlight the dynamic interdisciplinary work being undertaken by the faculty and graduate students in the Cell Biology, Stem Cells and Development Graduate Program at CU Anschutz.

Development

All animals begin life as a single cell, the result of a fusion between sperm and egg. Through a staggering multitude of molecular, cellular and tissue level events, a properly organized, multicellular embryo is formed. In the last decade, our understanding of many of these processes has expanded dramatically due to the advent of cellular, molecular biological and genetic approaches. Intriguingly, many of these processes first recognized in developmental contexts have also been implicated in human disease. These types of fundamental studies form the core of cutting edge research in Developmental Biology by faculty of the Graduate Program in Cell Biology, Stem Cells and Development at CU Anschutz.


Faculty List

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Bruce Appel PhD

Professor Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Development Developmental Biology Developmental Neuroscience
We investigate the genetic, molecular and cellular basis of brain development and myelination using zebrafish as a model system.

Linda Barlow PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Development Developmental Neuroscience Sensory Systems Stem Cells
We use in vivo molecular genetic mouse models, and in vitro taste organoids derived from adult lingual stem cells to understand how taste buds renew during normal homeostasis, and how this regenerative process is impacted by cancer therapies that cause taste dysfunction in patients.

Emily Bates PhD

(She/Her/Hers)
Associate Professor, MOLB Non-Training Faculty Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Accepting Students Development Developmental Biology Developmental Neuroscience Fly Research Group Genomics Bioinformatics Motor and Cognitive Disorders Other Developmental Disorders Signal Transduction
We study how ion channel activity (bioelectricity) contributes to morphological development in multiple tissues (craniofacial structures, fly wings, brain, pancreas, and bone).

Richard Benninger PhD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Cellular Physiology Molecular Nutrition & Metabolic Systems
The Benninger lab is a multi-disciplinary team of scientists who are guided by engineering principles and technologies to study the endocrine pancreas (islets of Langerhans). With mechanistic knowledge underlying the dynamics of islet function and hormone release, we can develop diagnostics and therapeutic interventions to effectively manage, cure and prevent diabetes. Towards this goal the lab combines novel optical imaging and ultrasound imaging approaches to study the function of the islets of Langerhans over multiple levels of organization, and how function is disrupted in diabetes.

Kristen Boyle PhD

(She/Hers)
Associate Professor
Research Focus: Development Developmental Biology Gene Regulation Molecular Nutrition & Metabolic Systems Stem Cells
Our research focuses on understanding how infants exposed to stressors in utero, such as obesity, diabetes, or biological stress, can predispose that child to obesity or metabolic disease using mesenchymal stem cells from infant umbilical cord tissue.

Martin Breuss PhD

(He/Him)
Assistant Professor
Research Focus: Development Genomics Bioinformatics Neuro Genetics Reproductive Biology
The Breuss laboratory is interested in genomic (and cellular) mosaicism. We assess its impact on human disease and utilize it as a tool to unravel mechanisms of development and cellular homeostasis. While we are broadly interested in these questions, two of our favorite systems to study are human germ cells and the brain.

James Bridges PhD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology Development
My primary research interests are focused toward: 1) understanding the regulation of alveolar epithelial cell maturation during lung development and 2) determining the molecular regulation of surfactant pool sizes in the postnatal and adult lung, with particular interest in diseases associated with surfactant dysfunction.

Joseph Brzezinski PhD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Development Developmental Neuroscience Sensory Systems
We are interested in uncovering the mechanisms that regulate mammalian retinal development and applying this knowledge to inform novel stem cell based treatments that restore vision. We primarily use the mouse as a model system, as its development is similar to human, and because there is a wealth of genetic resources we can utilize.

David Clouthier PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Development
Neural crest cells (NCCs) arise at the junction between the neural and non-neural ectoderm before moving ventrally around the embryo along the entire rostro-caudal axis. Cranial NCCs form most of the bone and cartilage in the face, explaining why defects in early NCC patterning are so devastating to human facial development. Our lab uses a number of cutting edge molecular and cellular techniques and approaches in both mouse and zebrafish models to dissect signaling networks that decide the fate of NCCs. We then use this information to better understand the basis for human birth defect syndromes affecting the face for which a genetic basis has not been established.

James Degregori PhD

(he/him/his)
Professor
Research Focus: Cancer Biology Cell Biology
Exploring the conditions that foster somatic evolution and discovering cancer vulnerabilities.

Peter Dempsey PhD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Stem Cells
Dr. Peter Dempsey's program focuses on the role of ADAM metalloproteinases in regulating extracellular signaling events involved in normal tissue homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract and during injury/inflammation and cancer pathogenesis.

Tobias Eckle MD, PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology
My research interests are primarily focused on investigating the effect of daylight/sunlight on human metabolism.

Patricia Ernst PhD

(she/her/hers)
Professor Completed Mentor Training Course, Upstander/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Cancer Biology Gene Regulation
Our group focuses on epigenetic mechanisms regulating normal hematopoiesis and leukemia focusing on MLL-family histone methyltransferases.

Katherine Fantauzzo PhD

Associate Professor Completed Mentor Training Course.
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Developmental Biology RNA Bioscience Signal Transduction
Our laboratory is focused on investigating the mechanism and function of signaling through a particular family of receptor tyrosine kinases, the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor family, in development of the mammalian neural crest-derived craniofacial skeleton.

Santos Franco PhD

Associate Professor Completed Mentor Training Courses, Implicit Bias Training, Upstander/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Development Developmental Neuroscience
The cerebral cortex is the control center of most of our higher-level brain functions, including thought, language, memory and emotion. During cortical development, billions of neurons and glia must be precisely specified and assembled into the intricate circuits that underlie these complex tasks. Disruption of these processes is associated with many devastating human neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability. Our lab studies several processes involved in the formation and function of neural circuits in the cerebral cortex.

Adam Green MD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Stem Cells
My research focuses on a specific type of cancer called high-grade glioma, an aggressive brain tumor affecting both children and adults. We focus especially on two pediatric subtypes called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma and pediatric glioblastoma. I work in the lab to find new treatments for these tumors; we then study the treatments in laboratory models of the tumors, including mouse models, and then bring the treatments most likely to be successful to clinical trials in children.

Lydia Heasley PhD

Assistant Professor Completed Mentor Training Course.
Research Focus: Accepting Students Chromosome Biology Microbiology Virology
How does the structure of a genome evolve over time? Our research investigates the molecular causes and phenotypic consequences of the broadly defined family of genomic features known as structural variations (SVs). SVs like aneuploidy, loss-of-heterozygosity, and copy number alteration are pervasive, yet poorly understood genomic elements which contribute significantly to the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic populations. Our current work is addressing many fascinating and important biological questions focused on understanding how SVs arise in the genome, and how these variations contribute to genome stability and evolution, phenotypic diversity, and cellular and organismal fitness.

Ethan Hughes PhD

(He/Him/His)
Associate Professor Completed Mentor Training Courses, Upstander/Bystander Training, Implicit Bias Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Cellular Structure Motor and Cognitive Disorders Neuroimmunology Optogenetics Synaptic Signaling and Plasticity
The long-term goals of our work are to understand how neuron-glial interactions modulate brain function and contribute to pathology in neurodegenerative disease. Towards this goal, we study the interactions of oligodendrocyte lineage cells with neurons in the adult cerebral cortex.

Sujatha Jagannathan PhD

Assistant Professor Completed Mentor Training Courses, Upstander/Bystander Training, Implicit Bias Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Gene Regulation Genomics Bioinformatics RNA Bioscience
Our lab studies how cells detect and degrade aberrant RNAs, and how dysregulation of this surveillance process contributes to human muscle development and disease.

Igor Kogut PhD

Associate Professor Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Cell Biology Cellular Structure Stem Cells
Investigating the mechanisms leading to cellular reprogramming and aging, as well as induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC)-associated cellular rejuvenation.

Edward Lau PhD

Assistant Professor, Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cardiovascular/Pulmonary/Renal/GI Physiology Cell Biology Cellular Physiology Genomics Bioinformatics
Our lab has a broad range of research interests, encompassing several areas of biochemistry and cell biology: Protein turnover: development and application of stable isotope labeling mass spectrometry methods to measure protein half-life Spatial proteomics: subcellular distributions of proteins, interaction between spatial and temporal protein dynamics Cellular physiology: cellular crosstalk by secretome proteins, signatures of cellular senescence, cardiotoxicity and proteostatic disruptions in induced pluripotent stem cell models Bioinformatics: correlation and discrepancies of transcript and protein levels, protein prediction with machine learning

Amanda Law PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Development Motor and Cognitive Disorders
My translational research program focuses on the developmental mechanisms underlying genetic and environmental risk for schizophrenia with the aim of identifying novel biological pathways for treatment development.

Shi-Long Lu MD, PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology
Role of PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway in HNSCC progression.

Traci Lyons PhD

(she/her/hers)
Associate Professor
Research Focus: Development
Dr. Lyons laboratory focuses on mechanisms of lymphatic mediated metastasis of breast cancer. Specifically, utilizing mouse models to investigate developmentally regulated programs of inflammation and lymphangiogenesis that are utilized in the adult mammary gland and may be hijacked by breast tumor cells. The results of these translational studies have the potential to instruct therapy aimed at prevention of breast cancer metastasis.

Wendy Macklin PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology Development Developmental Biology Developmental Neuroscience Gene Regulation Motor and Cognitive Disorders
Our research focuses on the following topics: (1) Signaling mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination; (2) The impact of ischemia on actively myelinating oligodendrocytes; (3) Demyelination induced by antibodies cloned from multiple sclerosis patients; and (4) Identification of small molecules that enhance oligodendrocyte differentiation.

Susan Majka PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cardiovascular/Pulmonary/Renal/GI Physiology Cell Biology Stem Cells
The focus of the work in the Majka laboratory is to understand how the normal and reparative function of resident lung mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC) is altered during the development and course of lung diseases (including pulmonary hypertension, fibrosis, emphysema and TSC/LAM).

Jennifer McKey PhD

(she/her/hers)
Assistant Professor Completed Mentor Training Course.
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Development Developmental Biology Reproductive Biology
Our growing team studies perinatal determinants of female fertility with a special focus on the relationship between establishment of architecture and functional differentiation of the mammalian ovary.

Jim McManaman PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology
Dr. McManaman’s current research interests are related to the cellular and systems physiology of lipid metabolism with particular emphasis on mammary gland function, neonatal metabolic health and obesity.

Michael McMurray PhD

Associate Professor Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Cell Biology Cellular Structure Macromolecular Structure
Our research focuses on identifying molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of macromolecular complexes, with a focus on multisubunit complexes formed by septin proteins. All cellular processes require the function of multisubunit complexes, and while much attention has been given to solving the final structures of such assemblies, comparatively little is known about how individual subunits adopt oligomerization-competent conformations and find their partner subunits in the crowded, dynamic cellular milieu.

Jeffrey Moore PhD

(he/him/his)
Associate Professor Director, Cell Biology, Stem Cells & Development Program; Completed Mentor Training Course, Upstander/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Cell Biology Chromosome Biology Genomics Bioinformatics
Molecular regulation of the microtubule network in cell division and disease.

Christian Mosimann PhD

(He/Him)
Associate Professor Completed CIMER Mentor Trainings, Leadership Course Trainings
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Biology Cell Biology Development Developmental Biology Gene Regulation Signal Transduction Stem Cells
The aim of our lab's research is to understand how cells acquire their fates during development and how these processes go wrong in congenital disease. As principal model, we use the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to investigate the earliest development of the cardiovascular system using lineage tracing, genome editing, live imaging, and more.

Jessica Nelson PhD

(She/Hers)
Assistant Professor Completed Mentor Training Courses, Implicit Bias Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Development Developmental Biology Developmental Neuroscience Gene Regulation Sensory Systems Synaptic Signaling and Plasticity
The Nelson Lab is focused on how sensory thresholds are established during development and how sensory processing deficits lead to human neurological disease. We use the larval zebrafish and a set of mutants identified through forward and reverse genetic screens aimed at identifying molecular and cellular mechanisms of sensory threshold establishment during development and sensory threshold plasticity through habituation. To better understand these mechanisms, we use a variety of techniques including behavior recording and analysis, whole brain activity mapping, and pharmacology.

James Nichols PhD

Associate Professor Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Accepting Students Development Developmental Biology
We are interested in the mechanisms that keep development on track, even when cells are faced with deleterious changes like genetic mutations.

Karin Payne PhD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Stem Cells
Our research focuses on the development of regenerative medicine approaches for bone and cartilage tissues, with a particular interest in treating growth plate (physeal) cartilage injuries, which represent a significant clinical problem in children.

Chad Pearson PhD

(he/him/his)
Professor Completed Mentor Training Course, Upstander/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Cellular Structure Macromolecular Structure
Centrosome and cilia biology in cell division, motility, and disease.

Eric Pietras PhD

Associate Professor Facilitated and Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cancer Biology Cell Biology Development Developmental Biology Inflammation Molecular Nutrition & Metabolic Systems Stem Cells
Interplay between inflammation and metabolism as a driver of leukemia development; targeting of pre-malignant and malignant blood-forming stem cells.

Rytis Prekeris PhD

Professor Director, Molecular Biology Program; Completed Mentor Training Course, Upstanding/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cancer Biology Cell Biology Cellular Structure Development Developmental Biology
Regulation of cell division, cell polarity and cell migration.

Tania Reis PhD

Associate Professor Facilitated and Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Development Developmental Biology Fly Research Group Genomics Bioinformatics Other Developmental Disorders Other Systems
Our lab is working on three main projects: (1) Identify pathways within the fat body that control organismal fat; (2) Determine the role in body fat regulation of a putative nutrient-responsive modifier of physical activity; and (3) Develop a functional map of neuronal control of body fat.

Diego Restrepo PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology Cellular Physiology Development Neuroengineering Optogenetics Other Systems Sensory Systems
I am a systems neuroscientist with a background in physics studying sensory decision making and neurological disorders using novel genomics, transcriptomics, computational neuroscience, automated behavioral testing, advanced neurophotonics and multielectrode arrays. I believe that diversity, equity and inclusion are key in neuroscience inquiry.

Olivia Rissland PhD

(she/her/hers)
Associate Professor Completed Mentor Training Course, Gilliam Advisor Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Developmental Biology Gene Regulation Genomics Bioinformatics Microbiology Virology RNA Bioscience
Our goal is to understand how translation impacts mRNA stability, and to place gene regulation in the contexts of broader biological processes.

Elle Roberson PhD

Assistant Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Development Reproductive Biology
We are interested in the regulatory networks controlling adult uterine remodeling, regeneration, and homeostasis. Our goal is to understand the etiology of infertility, pre-term birth, and other aspects of uterine health. We combine mouse genetics, cell and molecular biology, and systems biology methods.

Dennis Roop PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Development Stem Cells
His current, primary research focuses on generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from patients with inherited skin diseases, genetically correcting these cells and differentiating them into a skin stem cell lineage, which can be returned to the same patient.

Brian Russo PhD

Assistant Professor Completed Mentor Training Course.
Research Focus: Cell Biology Microbiology Virology
The Russo lab is interested in understanding how bacterial pathogens interact with their hosts. As a model, we investigate the pathogenesis of Shigella flexneri, which infects cells of the colon and causes diarrhea in humans.

Charles Sagerstrom PhD

Professor Completed Mentor Training Course, Upstander/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Development Developmental Biology Gene Regulation Genomics Bioinformatics
Our lab uses zebrafish to study transcriptional and epigenetic control of key transitions during embryogenesis. We are particularly interested in understanding the onset of zygotic transcription at the maternal-to-zygotic transition, ​and in unraveling the transcription orogram driving neural cell fates beginning during gastrulation.

Stephen Santoro PhD

Assistant Professor Completed Mentor Training Course.
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Cellular Physiology Development Developmental Biology Developmental Neuroscience Sensory Systems Stem Cells
We are interested in how life experience guides the development and adaptation of the mammalian nervous system. We recently discovered that, in mice, olfactory experience regulates the relative birthrates of the > 1000 distinct olfactory sensory neuron subtypes in an odor-specific manner. These findings have led us to hypothesize that life-long olfactory sensory neurogenesis performs an unknown adaptive role, in addition to the known reparative one. We are currently investigating the mechanism and function of this phenomenon. These studies are anticipated to elucidate fundamental aspects about how the olfactory system develops, adapts, and frequently loses function with age and disease.

David Schwartz MD

(He/Him)
Distinguished Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Biology Cell Biology Epigenetics Gene Regulation Genomics Bioinformatics
Our group investigates the genetic and biological determinants of diseases that are influenced by the environment. Our previous research focused on the lungs and the immune system, trying to understand why environmental agents cause lung disease and infections in some people but not others. We have discovered that a variant of the gene TLR4 makes some people more susceptible to adverse effects of bacteria, that epigenetic mechanisms may be important in Th2 skewing, and that a variant in a mucus producing gene (MUC5B) in the lung is the dominant risk factor for pulmonary fibrosis. We are currently pursing the basic mechanisms that cause MUC5B driven lung fibrosis.

Julie Siegenthaler PhD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Development Developmental Neuroscience
Our lab studies the interplay between the CNS and its vital support structures the meninges and the brain vasculature. We have meninges and brain vascular projects in CNS development, the adult brain and CNS injury and disease.

Emily Su MD, MSCI

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology Development
The Su Lab’s primary research focus is to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal placental blood flow and function. One common finding in placentas from pregnancies complicated by severe FGR is maldevelopment of the placental vascular tree as a consequence of impaired angiogenesis. We are investigating cellular and molecular derangements from human placental endothelial cells isolated from pregnancies complicated by severe FGR that underlie compromised endothelial cell migration. More recently, we have begun to study the role of the placental microenvironment, with focus on the placental villous stroma and on placental endothelial cell-extracellular matrix interactions. The ultimate goal of our research is to understand mechanisms underlying aberrant placental function in severe FGR that will lead to prevention strategies and treatment modalities.

Kelly Sullivan PhD

Assistant Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology Development
Deciphering the role of interferon signaling in Down syndrome using a combination of cell-based and in vivo models.

Lori Sussel PhD

Professor Completed Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Cellular Structure Development Developmental Biology Genomics Bioinformatics
The main focus of the Sussel lab is to understand the complex transcriptional networks that regulate development, differentiation and function of the pancreas.

Matthew Taliaferro PhD

Assistant Professor Completed Mentor Training Course, Upstander/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Cellular Structure Gene Regulation Genomics Bioinformatics RNA Bioscience
We study how the expression of genetic information is spatially regulated within a cell.

Arianne Theiss PhD

(she/her/hers)
Associate Professor Completed Upstander/Bystander Training, Mentor Training Course, Bias Reduction Course
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cancer Biology Cardiovascular/Pulmonary/Renal/GI Physiology Cell Biology Cellular Physiology Host-Pathogen Interactions Inflammation Innate Immunity Stem Cells
The overall goal of the Theiss Lab is to elucidate the role and mechanism whereby mitochondrial signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells contribute to gastrointestinal diseases, specifically inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colorectal cancer.

Ronald Vagnozzi PhD

Assistant Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology
Our lab studies the cellular mechanisms of injury and stress responses in the heart. We are particularly interested in the innate immune system and how inflammation impacts wound healing, fibrosis, and tissue remodeling in beneficial as well as adverse ways. We use the mouse as our primary model, which allows us to interrogate gene functions and signaling pathways, perform genetic lineage tracing, and mimic complex cardiovascular pathology in a mammalian system. Our goal is to understand the regulatory mechanisms of cardiac wound healing and discover novel approaches to repair or even rejuvenate the damaged heart. Our approach, first and foremost, is driven by a shared lab culture of teamwork, discovery, and high-quality science.

Rajeev Vibhakar MD, PhD, MPH/MSPH

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology
My research focuses on genetic mechanisms by which normal brain cells become cancerous and how these genetic differences can be used to better diagnose and treat children with brain tumors,

Eszter Vladar PhD

Assistant Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology Cellular Structure Gene Regulation
We use mice and primary mouse and human cell culture to study how multiciliated cells adopt their cell fate, build cilia and orient the cilia for directional clearance. We investigate the pathways that drive these processes during normal development and regeneration and study how they are misregulated in human disease. Our research has the potential to develop novel biomarkers and therapeutics for individuals suffering from chronic airway diseases.

Gregory Way PhD

Assistant Professor Completed Upstander/Bystander Training, Mentor Training Course
Research Focus: Accepting Students Computational Biology
The mission of our lab is to reduce human suffering by integrating biomedical data science and software engineering into drug discovery by developing new computational methods, innovative approaches, assays, and software for analyzing high-dimensional genomic, molecular, and microscopy data with a focus on pediatric diseases, including pediatric cancer and Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1).

Trevor Williams PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Cancer Biology Development Developmental Biology Gene Regulation
Transcriptional regulation of mouse embryonic development.

Michael Yeager PhD

Associate Professor
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cell Biology
The primary goal of the Yeager Lab is to understand how the lung vasculature (blood and lymphatic) operates during episodes of acute and chronic inflammation. The Yeager Lab examines lung tissue and peripheral blood immune cells from patients with pulmonary hypertension, including persons with Down syndrome.

Ning Zhao PhD

Assistant Professor, Completed Maximizing Mentoring Workshop, Upstander/Bystander Training
Research Focus: Accepting Students Cancer Biology Cell Biology Gene Regulation Macromolecular Structure RNA Bioscience
My lab focuses on developing technologies that enable tracking the full life cycle of proteins in real time with high spatiotemporal resolution in their native intracellular environments. This will help us understand when, where, and how proteins are synthesized, folded, modified, and degraded in both healthy and diseased cells.

Michael Zuscik PhD

Professor
Research Focus: Cell Biology Stem Cells
The central focus of our research can be divided programmatically into three parts: 1) Study of the pathological impact of obesity on the skeleton, particularly bone and joint health and fracture healing, 2) Elucidating the role of the gut microbiome in posttraumatic and obesity-associated osteoarthritis, and 3) Development of disease-modifying treatments to address joint degeneration in osteoarthritis. Our work spans from bench to bedside, involving basic molecular-cellular biology and microbiology in microbial and cell culture systems, state-of-the-art animal models of disease, and human clinical trials. Our aim is to pursue a basic study of skeletal homeostasis and disease, using information gained from that work to develop therapeutic strategies addressing key orthopedic challenges including fracture non-union, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis.
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